Where the WUI is: Implications for wildfire mitigation and outreach communities: Research Brief

Where the WUI is: Implications for wildfire mitigation and outreach communities: Research Brief

The WUI is often synonymous with fire risk to buildings, but this research suggests that this is not the case in all fire-prone states. While fire outreach was often present near areas where buildings are destroyed by wildfire, many communities are established after major fires.

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Rapid growth of the US wildland-urban interface raises wildfire risk: Research Article

Rapid growth of the US wildland-urban interface raises wildfire risk: Research Article

Abstract
The wildland-urban interface (WUI) is the area where houses and wildland vegetation meet or intermingle, and where wildfire problems are most pronounced. Here we report that the WUI in the United States grew rapidly from 1990 to 2010 in terms of both number of new houses (from 30.8 to 43.4 million; 41% growth) and land area (from 581,000 to 770,000 km2; 33% growth), making it the fastest-growing land use type in the conterminous United States. The vast majority of new WUI areas were the result of new housing (97%), not related to an increase in wildland vegetation. Within the perimeter of recent wildfires (1990–2015), there were 286,000 houses in 2010, compared with 177,000 in 1990. Furthermore, WUI growth often results in more wildfire ignitions, putting more lives and houses at risk. Wildfire problems will not abate if recent housing growth trends continue.

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Land Use Planning to Reduce WUI Fire Risk in France and California: Research Brief

Land Use Planning to Reduce WUI Fire Risk in France and California: Research Brief

Both Southern France and California have large amounts of housing in the Wildland Urban Interface where local vegetation is highly dense and fire adapted. This research brief compares the land use policies used to reduce the exposure of homes to wildfire in these two locations.  

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Relative Importance of Building Materials on Structure Survival in San Diego County WUI Wildfires: Research Brief

 Relative Importance of Building Materials on Structure Survival in San Diego County WUI Wildfires: Research Brief

The design and materials used in construction is critical to preventing structure loss during wildland urban interface (WUI) fires. This research helps planners and homeowners by ranking specific construction materials by fire safety effectiveness, then comparing their use to landscape-scale design attributes.

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Strategic Land Purchases for Private Land Conservation to Reduce Fire Risk: Research Briefs

Strategic Land Purchases for Private Land Conservation to Reduce Fire Risk: Research Briefs

In Southern California,  fuel treatment strategies often put fire risk reduction and biodiversity conservation goals at odds with each other. In response to this conflict, two of our briefs (Syphard et al. 2016; Butsic et al. 2016) explore a novel new approach. 

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Lessons From the October 2003 Wildfires in Southern California USGS Research brief

This research brief discusses the lessons learned from the costly fires of 2003 in Southern California. Recommendations on future fuel reduction strategies and placement are discussed. 

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The Built Environment Is More Influential Than Fuel Breaks in Exposure to Wind-Driven Chaparral Fire: USGS Research Brief

A Bayesian Network model was used to evaluate the relative importance of fuel and fuel treatments compared to weather and variables of the built and natural environment on wildfire risk at the wildland-urban interface (WUI) in San Diego County. 
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Vegetation Succession & Fire in California’s Bay Area: Research Brief

 This  2003  study used aerial  photos  taken  between 1939 and  1997 to  quantify  vegetation  change  in  the  landscape   mosaic  of  grasslands,  shrublands,  woodlands and   forests of the San Francisco Bay Area. 
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