Pratt’s Arguments Against “Light Burning” in 1911: Research Brief

Mr. Pratt in 1911 published an argument against the “light burning” practices of those days, claiming these small fires were unnecessary and only caused an expensive loss of merchantable lumber over the years. Like other light-burning advocates, he had no research on his side.  
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"Light Burning" Debate in the early 1900's: Research Brief Series

In the early 20th century, there was an intense controversy over systematic “light burning, the practice of using cool fire as a management tool (similar to what we call prescribed fires today). These practices for fire control were highly debated before fire suppression policies overwhelmingly prevailed. Presented here is a series of research briefs that review publications from this controversy at this interesting look into history.

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Prescribed burning and the drought: go or no go? Research Brief

Prescribed burning and the drought: go or no go? Research Brief

Research Brief/Management Consideration. One topic that is generating a great deal of interest among fire management professionals as California enters the fall prescribed fire season is whether we should be burning during this fourth year of drought.  This brief discusses what managers should consider before doing a prescribed burn.

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Opportunities for improved fire use and management in California: lessons from Western Australia: Technical Report

Abstract: "As the large scale of fuel treatments needed to promote ecosystem health and reduce heavy fuel loads becomes clear in California’s mixed conifer forests, managers are beginning to focus on how to scale up prescribed fire use in order to treat a meaningful portion of the landscape. We look at the example of Western Australia’s large-scale and highly successful prescribed burning program by their Department of Environment and Conservation as a model for emulation by land management agencies in California. Focusing on: 1) novel management practices, 2) inter-agency collaboration, 3) regulatory collaboration and policy, 4) research integration, 5) cultural acceptance, and 6) political support of prescribed fire, we make recommendations for a new approach to the management and regulation of fire use in California’s mixed conifer forests."       
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CFSC blog post about the report>

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Forest ecosystem health & aspen restoration: Presentation PDF

Presented at the Aspen Restoration and Ecology Workshop, South Lake Tahoe, CA, 2014.
This presentation discusses the active management restoration projects for Aspen in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Issues of resilience, implementation strategies, and multiple resource benefits are highlighted. 

Presenter: Dave Fournier
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Fire regimes of quaking aspen in the mountain west: Presentation PDF

Presented at the Aspen Restoration and Ecology Workshop, South Lake Tahoe, CA, 2014.
The 5 objectives of this presentation are:
1. Provide a brief overview of aspen fire ecology 2. Discuss methods to understand reconstruct fire regimes 3. Synthesize existing research literature that pertains to estimating aspen fire regimes in the Mountain West (U.S.) 4. Suggest a conceptual classification framework for aspen fire regimes in the Mountain West 5. Identify key knowledge gaps and research needs (incl. climate change)

Presenter: Douglas Shinneman
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Vegetation response to restoration thinning and slash pile burning in aspen: Presentation PDF

This is a presentation from the Aspen Restoration and Ecology Workshop in 2015.  This study's findings support notion that heavier thinning favors aspen/plants and longer treatment persistence but cut conifer fuel load becomes excessive.

Presenter:  Pascal Berrill/ Christa M. Dagley   
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Prescribed fires do not reduce future area burned in central and southern California: USGS Research Brief

Researchers used 29 years of historical fire mapping to quantify the relationship between annual wildfire area and previous fire area in seven California counties to address the question of prescribed fire effectiveness in these counties. 
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Resource Objective Wildfires Benefit Forests: Research Brief

A 2015 study by Meyer showed that the natural range of variation (NRV) concept and key fire severity indicators could be used to quantitatively evaluate the landscape-scale effects of large wildfires managed for resource objectives.
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Yikes! An Old-school Wildlife “Experiment” Involving Fire: Research Brief

This  1952  study  is  a  questionably  designed   attempt  to  measure  wildlife  survival  during   prescribed  fire.  The  most  dubious  part  of  the   project  involves  burying  live-­‐trapped  animals  in   the  path  of  a  controlled  burn.  
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Using fire to increase the scale and benefits of forest fuel treatments: Research Brief

This brief discussed a 2012 study that indicates less than 20% of national forest and national park lands in the Sierra Nevada are experiencing fuels treatments needed to mitigate continuing degradation from either the lack of fire or wildfire burning at high severity.

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Using Fire for Invasive Plant Control in Wildlands: USGS Research Brief

This brief summarizes the current state of knowledge on the use of fire as a tool to manage invasive plants in wildlands. The authors of two publications discuss risks and challenges of conducting prescribed burns, types of systems and circumstances in which burning may be effective for the management of invasive plants, complexities of fire and plant community interactions, impacts of prescribed burning on the broader plant community and the soil, and comprehensive monitoring plans.

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