Non-Native Plants, Fuels, and Desert Revegetation: Research Brief

Non-Native Plants, Fuels, and Desert Revegetation: Research Brief

To revegetate disturbed desert lands, practitioners often reestablish fertile islands as a first step in restoring native plants and associated fauna on disturbed desert sites. This research brief discusses the pros and cons of this approach considering native and non-native species.

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Modeling Desert Shrubland Changes with an Invasive Grass Introduction and Climate Change: Research Brief

Modeling Desert Shrubland Changes with an Invasive Grass Introduction and Climate Change: Research Brief

For desert shrubland species that have evolved without fire, the introduction of a grass-fire, positive feedback cycle is particularly problematic. This brief discusses work done by researchers who modeled the grass-fire cycle for non-fire-adapted desert shrublands under three sets of climate conditions.

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Increasing Fire Activity for Arid California: Different Fire Trends from Different Fire Drivers: Research Brief

Increasing Fire Activity for Arid California: Different Fire Trends from Different Fire Drivers: Research Brief

Study results from arid regions in Southern California show how fire trends differ based on unique sets of circumstances. This brief discuses how combinations of direct drivers (like powerline and roadside ignitions),  indirect drivers (like invasive grasses, air pollution, and landscape fragmentation terrestrial intactness) and unknown factors cause diversity in fire trends.

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Synthesizing Best-Management Practices for Desert Tortoise Habitats: Research Brief

Synthesizing Best-Management Practices for Desert Tortoise Habitats: Research Brief

In a collaborative project funded by the non-profit Desert Tortoise Council with Natural Resource Conservation LLC, the authors synthesized published literature and practitioner’s experiences to develop best-management practices for habitats of desert tortoises. 

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Restoring Desert Biocrusts after Severe Disturbances: Research Brief

Restoring Desert Biocrusts after Severe Disturbances: Research Brief

Collaboratively with the National Park Service, the authors performed a study along Northshore Road in Lake Mead National Recreation Area (eastern Mojave Desert, Nevada) to develop biocrust restoration strategies. Results and management recommendations for the most effective restoration methods are discussed. 

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Longer-term post fire vegetation dynamics and predicted invasive species habitat suitability: Presentation PDF

Presented at the Mojave Desert Fire Science and Management Workshop. Barstow, CA 2014.
This presentation explains the use and implication of utilizing modeling tools to predict invasive species distribution after a fire. 
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Prehistoric and historic fire in the Mojave Desert: Presentation PDF

Presented at the Mojave Desert Fire Science and Management Workshop. Barstow, CA 2014.

Conclusions from this presentation include statements about the prehistoric, historic, and current characteristics in the Mojave desert area. For example, high elevation and riparian vegetation types contain many species that evolved with fire, whereas lower elevation vegetation is characterized by species that evolved with very little fire.

Presenter: Matthew Brooks

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Precipitation Regime Classification for the Mojave Desert:Presentation PDF

The goals of this project were to provide a more detailed representation of the rainfall patterns in the Mojave and to compare the current precipitation regime and patterns with both historic patterns and predicted future patterns.

Presenter: Jerry Tagestad et al.
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Modeling Probability of Ignition & Fire Severity Across The Mojave Ecoregion: Presentation PDF

Presented at the Mojave Desert Fire Science and Management Workshop. Barstow, CA 2014.
This presentation discusses the process of model development to map the ignition probability and fire severity. 
Presenter: Emma Underwood et al.
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Fire In The Mojave Ecoregion: Past, Present, And A Little Bit Into The Future: Presentation PDF

This presentation discusses findings from two large scale integrated projects. The overarching goals of these projects were to use models and create tools about resource issues such as non-native species, postfire vegetation, ignition likelihood and fire severity.
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A Decision Framework for Fire as a Restoration Tool: Research Brief

This journal article provides a decision framework that integrates fire regime components, plant growth form, and survival attributes to predict how plants will respond to fires and how fires can be prescribed to enhance the likelihood of obtaining desired plant responses. 
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Wildland Fire in Ecosystems: Fire and Nonnative Invasive Plants: USGS Research Brief

Presented here is scientific information regarding wildland fire and nonnative invasive plant species, identifies the nonnative invasive species currently of greatest concern in major bioregions of the United States, and describes emerging fire-invasive issues in each bioregion and throughout the nation. 
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Using Fire for Invasive Plant Control in Wildlands: USGS Research Brief

This brief summarizes the current state of knowledge on the use of fire as a tool to manage invasive plants in wildlands. The authors of two publications discuss risks and challenges of conducting prescribed burns, types of systems and circumstances in which burning may be effective for the management of invasive plants, complexities of fire and plant community interactions, impacts of prescribed burning on the broader plant community and the soil, and comprehensive monitoring plans.

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