Treating Forests more strategically to Reduce Fire Severity and Carbon Loss: Research Brief

Treating Forests more strategically to Reduce Fire Severity and Carbon Loss: Research Brief

Locating forest treatments in the right places can make them as or more effective than treating everywhere, shows new research out by Krofcheck et al. 2018. The authors found that restoring less acres strategically can have the same impacts as treating more area indiscriminately in terms of reducing high severity wildfire risk and carbon instability.

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Natural experiment shows SPLAT fuel treatment efficacy: Research Brief

Natural experiment shows SPLAT fuel treatment efficacy: Research Brief

Strategically placed landscape area fuel treatments (SPLATs) in the Sierra Nevada were put to the test in this study when the American Fire burned through previously treated areas. Both fire effects and initial post-fire conifer regeneration were investigated.

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Do fuel reduction treatments cause beetle mortality or resilience? Research Brief

Do fuel reduction treatments cause beetle mortality or resilience? Research Brief

During normal levels of beetle activity, fuel treatment reductions either cause no trees to die from beetles or just a few. If tree deaths occur, they reinforce fuel hazard reduction and forest restoration goals. 

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Post-fire Accumulation and Spatial Arrangement of Fuels in Varying Aged Chaparral Stands: Research Brief

Post-fire Accumulation and Spatial Arrangement of Fuels in Varying Aged Chaparral Stands: Research Brief

The authors demonstrate how combining detailed field measurements with remote sensing imagery is a valuable method for capturing the spatial arrangement and variation of fuel loading in a chaparral landscape. 

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Wildfires Differences among Agencies and Ecoregions in the Sierra Nevada: Research Brief

Wildfires Differences among Agencies and Ecoregions in the Sierra Nevada: Research Brief

A 2012 study by Miller and others suggests that fire management approaches used by the National Park Service in Yosemite National Park could assist in the restoration and maintenance of Sierra Nevada forest ecosystems.

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What affects fire behavior more, climate or fuels? Research Brief

What affects fire behavior more, climate or fuels? Research Brief

The authors examined the relationship between fuels and fire behavior by examining how fire suppression has affected fire severity in different forest ecosystems in California. The authors tested the hypothesis that fire behavior is limited by fuel availability in some California forests where climatic conditions during the fire season are nearly always conducive to burning and the primary limiting factor for fire ignition and spread is the presence of sufficient fuel.

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Fire and fuel treatment effects on understory plant diversity in California mixed-conifer forests: Research Brief

Fire and fuel treatment effects on understory plant diversity in California mixed-conifer forests: Research Brief

The authors surveyed understory vegetation across a gradient of increasing canopy loss, ranging from unmanaged forest to fuel treatments, fuel treatments followed by low-moderate severity wildfire, and high-severity wildfire only.

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The Role of Fire and Fuels Management in Chaparral Restoration: Presentation PDF

Presentation from the June 2013 Chaparral Restoration Workshop in Arcadia, CA.  Is there a role for fuels management in chaparral restoration? The trade-offs to this question and recommendations for this answer are explored in this presentation. 

Presenter: Alexandra D. Syphard, Conservation Biology Institute; Tess Brennan and Jon E. Keeley, USGS Western Ecological Research Center.  
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Vegetation response to restoration thinning and slash pile burning in aspen: Presentation PDF

This is a presentation from the Aspen Restoration and Ecology Workshop in 2015.  This study's findings support notion that heavier thinning favors aspen/plants and longer treatment persistence but cut conifer fuel load becomes excessive.

Presenter:  Pascal Berrill/ Christa M. Dagley   
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Resource Objective Wildfires Benefit Forests: Research Brief

A 2015 study by Meyer showed that the natural range of variation (NRV) concept and key fire severity indicators could be used to quantitatively evaluate the landscape-scale effects of large wildfires managed for resource objectives.
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Constraints on Mechanical Treatment in the Sierra Nevada: Research Brief

The authors evaluated current USFS standards and guidelines, input from forest management practitioners, and geospatial data to develop a hierarchy of biological (i.e., nonproductive forest), legal (i.e., wilderness), operational (i.e., equipment access), and administrative (i.e., sensitive species and riparian areas) constraints on mechanical treatments.
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Using fire to increase the scale and benefits of forest fuel treatments: Research Brief

This brief discussed a 2012 study that indicates less than 20% of national forest and national park lands in the Sierra Nevada are experiencing fuels treatments needed to mitigate continuing degradation from either the lack of fire or wildfire burning at high severity.

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Three-year Mashing Operations for Better Deer Forage: Research Brief

In  the  interest  of  increasing browse  for deer   populations  on  California  chaparral lands,  a   brush  manipulation  program was  conducted by   the  California  Department  of  Fish & Game  (CDFG) from  1955  to  1960. The results of this project are discussed in this brief. 
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