Synthesis of Knowledge of Extreme Fire Behavior: Volume I for Fire Managers General Technical Report

Abstract: The objective of this project is to synthesize existing (extreme fire behavior) EFB knowledge in a way that connects the weather, fuel, and topographic factors that contribute to development of EFB. This synthesis will focus on the state of the science, but will also consider how that science is currently presented to the fire management community, including incident commanders, fire behavior analysts, incident meteorologists, National Weather Service office forecasters, and firefighters. It will seek to clearly delineate the known, the unknown, and areas of research with the greatest potential impact on firefighter protection.
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The Built Environment Is More Influential Than Fuel Breaks in Exposure to Wind-Driven Chaparral Fire: USGS Research Brief

A Bayesian Network model was used to evaluate the relative importance of fuel and fuel treatments compared to weather and variables of the built and natural environment on wildfire risk at the wildland-urban interface (WUI) in San Diego County. 
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Resource Objective Wildfires Benefit Forests: Research Brief

A 2015 study by Meyer showed that the natural range of variation (NRV) concept and key fire severity indicators could be used to quantitatively evaluate the landscape-scale effects of large wildfires managed for resource objectives.
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Structure, fuels and fire behavior in Sierran riparian and upland forest: past and present: Research Brief

Authors of this paper present quantitative information on the differences in stand structure, fuel loading,  and fire behavior in current and reconstructed riparian and upland areas in the Sierra Nevada.
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Seasonal variations in fuel moisture from thinning: Research Brief

The  objective  of  this  study  was  to investigate  the   influence  of  thinning  treatments  on  fuel  moisture and determine  whether  or  not  moisture patterns   differ by  treatment  in mixed conifer  stands  in   northern  California.
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Interactions among wildland fires in a long-established Sierra Nevada natural fire area: Research Brief

 A   2009  study  by  Collins  et  al.  suggests  that  freely   burning  fires  in  upper  elevation  mixed-­‐conifer   forests  of  the  Sierra  Nevada  may  effectively   regulate  fire-­‐induced  effects  across  an  entire   landscape.
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Fuel Age and Fire Spread in Chaparral Ecosystems: USGS Research Brief

In a paper published in Fire Management Today, USGS scientist Jon Keeley coauthors a paper with colleagues from the California Chaparral Institute that analyzes weather and fuel factors in a case study of a critical part of the 2003 Cedar Fire perimeter in San Diego County. 
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Fire Temperature Patterns and Effects on Annual Plants in the Mojave Desert: USGS Research Brief

In a recent issue of the journal Ecological Applications, USGS scientist Dr. Matthew Brooks reports new information on temperature patterns during experimental fires, and the effects of these variable fire temperatures on annual plants in the Mojave Desert.
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Effect of leaf beetle herbivory on the fire behavior of invasive tamarisk: USGS Research Brief

Invasions of nonnative Tamarix spp. into desert riparian ecosystems in the southwestern U.S. and its replacement of native vegetation raises questions about potential shifts in fuel characteristics and fire behavior.
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Do 1% of Fires Cause 99% of the Acres Burned? Research Brief

Empirical analysis  of  fire  history   data  by  David  Strauss  and  colleagues confirmed   that  a relatively  small  number  of  forest  fires  are   responsible for  a  very  high  proportion  of  the  total   area  burned. 
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Behavior and effects of prescribed fire in masticated fuelbeds: Research Brief

The  authors  conducted prescribed  burns in  two   masticated  areas  in  northern  California to assess   fire  effects  in  treated stands,  compare  fire   behavior  and  effects  with  outputs  from  commonly   used  models,  and  evaluate  the  ability  of   mastication  to  increase  stand  resilience  under  a   range  of  hypothetical  wildfire  scenarios.

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