Valuing Chaparral: Video

Valuing Chaparral: Video

Do you have any idea just how valuable chaparral is? Most of us don't realize that these often overlooked lands provide essential benefits worth billions of dollars. The four southernmost forests in California actually contain more chaparral shrubland than forest. This animation describes the benefits and values of these often under-appreciated lands.

View on youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-8KFNr1c9o

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What Type-converts Chaparral to Grassland in SoCA? Research Brief

What Type-converts Chaparral to Grassland in SoCA? Research Brief

The authors show a direct connection between a diverse set of drivers and type-converted chaparral in Southern California. Example drivers include high frequency fire, land-use disturbance, moisture availability, and site flatness.

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Researchers & Professionals- Partnering For Ecosystem Conservation is Essential: Research Brief

Researchers & Professionals- Partnering For Ecosystem Conservation is Essential: Research Brief

Discussions of successes, struggles, and failures with partner-specific tools are vital to the successful implementation of “translational ecology” a formal term for biological conservation partnerships.

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Extreme Drought Causes Chaparral Type Conversion: Research Brief

Extreme Drought Causes Chaparral Type Conversion: Research Brief

The rugged, chaparral dominated Angeles National Forest (ANF, California) is a beautiful and popular recreation destination. However, it is being damaged by a combination of overwhelming anthropogenic stressors, including climate change-induced mega-droughts, unnaturally shortened fire intervals, very poor air quality (e.g., high levels of nitrogen deposition), and the invasion of non-native groundcover plants.

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Non-Native Plants, Fuels, and Desert Revegetation: Research Brief

Non-Native Plants, Fuels, and Desert Revegetation: Research Brief

To revegetate disturbed desert lands, practitioners often reestablish fertile islands as a first step in restoring native plants and associated fauna on disturbed desert sites. This research brief discusses the pros and cons of this approach considering native and non-native species.

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Vulnerability of chaparral plant functional types to multiple stressors: climate, fire and land use: Recorded Presentation

Vulnerability of chaparral plant functional types to multiple stressors: climate, fire and land use:  Recorded Presentation

Presenter: Janet Franklin (UC Riverside)

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Presented at the 3rd California Chaparral Symposium: Global Change and the Vulnerability of Chaparral Ecosystems. May 14-16, 2018. Arcadia, CA.  

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Global change and the vulnerability of chaparral shrubs to acute drought versus chronic drought: Recorded Presentation

Global change and the vulnerability of chaparral shrubs to acute drought versus chronic drought:  Recorded Presentation

Presenter: Stephen Davis (Pepperdine Univ.)

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Presented at the 3rd California Chaparral Symposium: Global Change and the Vulnerability of Chaparral Ecosystems. May 14-16, 2018. Arcadia, CA.  

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Chaparral Bird Communities Harmed by Shrub Removal: Research Brief

Chaparral Bird Communities Harmed by Shrub Removal: Research Brief

To help managers make science-based decisions that incorporate wildlife information, this study experimentally compared the effects of two pre-fire vegetation reduction treatments (prescribed burning and shrub mastication) on the chaparral bird community.

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Human Presence Diminishes the Importance of Climate in Determining U.S. Fire Activity: Research Brief

Human Presence Diminishes the Importance of Climate in Determining U.S. Fire Activity: Research Brief

In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers with the Conservation Biology Institute and the U.S. Geological Survey showed that, across the U.S. on landscapes dominated by humans, climate has played a relatively small role in determining wildfire activity.

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Evolution and Biogeography of Epicormic Resprouting: Research Brief

Evolution and Biogeography of Epicormic Resprouting: Research Brief

This brief describes the advantages and evolution of postfire epicormic resprouting, where trees resprout from the trunk or stem of trees. This form of resprouting is more rare than resprouting from the base of plants and occurs in Australia and South Africa, as well as in California, the Mediterranean Basin and the Canary Islands in the northern hemisphere.

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Modeling Desert Shrubland Changes with an Invasive Grass Introduction and Climate Change: Research Brief

Modeling Desert Shrubland Changes with an Invasive Grass Introduction and Climate Change: Research Brief

For desert shrubland species that have evolved without fire, the introduction of a grass-fire, positive feedback cycle is particularly problematic. This brief discusses work done by researchers who modeled the grass-fire cycle for non-fire-adapted desert shrublands under three sets of climate conditions.

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Increasing Fire Activity for Arid California: Different Fire Trends from Different Fire Drivers: Research Brief

Increasing Fire Activity for Arid California: Different Fire Trends from Different Fire Drivers: Research Brief

Study results from arid regions in Southern California show how fire trends differ based on unique sets of circumstances. This brief discuses how combinations of direct drivers (like powerline and roadside ignitions),  indirect drivers (like invasive grasses, air pollution, and landscape fragmentation terrestrial intactness) and unknown factors cause diversity in fire trends.

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Parsing Ecosystem Responses: Divergent Fire-Climate Patterns for California Landscapes: Research Brief

Parsing Ecosystem Responses: Divergent Fire-Climate Patterns for California Landscapes: Research Brief

In an era of concern over climate change, it's important to understand how different kinds of fire-adapted of ecosystems in California may respond to climate change in relation to fire. This study categorized Californian ecosystems into three types and discusses how each may be affected by climate change and fire.

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