Here's our newest briefs from the CFSC


How to Protect Old Trees When Reintroducing Fire

This brief is based on a synthesis that covers recent research documenting effects of introducing fire in fire suppressed forests, provides necessary background information to understand the breadth of the problem, provides realistic management solutions to reduce impacts and defines monitoring techniques to identify treatment effects.

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Understanding Spatial Controls of Mixed-Severity Fire

Understanding the relative importance of biological and environmental characteristics conducive to a moderate severity wildfire can help managers predict outcomes to better guide when and where fires can safely be managed.

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Using historical forest density estimates to inform management of contemporary Sierra Nevada forests

This brief discusses and compares the two methods used to estimate historic tree densities of the Sierra Nevada. The study suggests that density estimates from distance-based estimators support the historical density estimates derived from timber inventories and reconstructions.

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Spatial predictions of conifer regeneration after wildfire may help managers prioritize reforestation efforts

Recent work by researchers from U.C. Berkeley and the U.S. Forest Service has produced a spatially-explicit predictive model that can be used to forecast where regeneration of (non-serotinous) conifers is most likely to occur after wildfire. This predictive model combines seed availability with climatic, topographic, and burn severity data to forecast the spatial patterns of post-fire conifer regeneration

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Humans and Fire in the CA South Coast Bioregion

The ecosystems within the South Coast bioregion have accumulated very different sets of modern fire management problems that are vegetation, weather, and location specific.

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Extreme Drought Causes Chaparral Type Conversion

The rugged, chaparral dominated Angeles National Forest (ANF, California) is a beautiful and popular recreation destination. However, it is being damaged by a combination of overwhelming anthropogenic stressors, including climate change-induced mega-droughts, unnaturally shortened fire intervals, very poor air quality (e.g., high levels of nitrogen deposition), and the invasion of non-native groundcover plants.

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Researchers & Professionals- Partnering For Ecosystem Conservation is Essential

Discussions of successes, struggles, and failures with partner-specific tools are vital to the successful implementation of “translational ecology” a formal term for biological conservation partnerships.

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What Type-converts Chaparral to Grassland in SoCA?

The authors show a direct connection between a diverse set of drivers and type-converted chaparral in Southern California. Example drivers include high frequency fire, land-use disturbance, moisture availability, and site flatness.

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